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Asian -> General Discussion / Re: Student Visas
« Last post by Calipro on Yesterday at 10:22:07 PM »

My four siblings all still live there and they would not trade Canada for anything. At one time some of them would have gone to the US but not any more.


I looked into the health care benefits and the different provinces have different rules. Some of them require longer or shorter times to be a resident in the province in order not to lose coverage. That's why I am considering buying a house in rural Nova Scotia where you only have to live five months a year in order to be covered all year.


What do your siblings think about the law C 16 and the forced speech movement in Canada?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04wyGK6k6HE&t=2111s
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robert angel wrote:
Now this reminds me of a scene from the movie "El Cid" where  The Cid (not Sid Cherise) is laying siege to Valencia controlled by the Moors. In a key scene he yells out to the besieged within the walls: "I do not bring you fire and the sword. I bring you BREAD!!!!!". And the trebuchets are let loose filled with loaves of bread. After the bread lands withing the walls and the populace find the bread lying in the streets, the Moorish Caliph is overthrown by the mob. Great Scene.

All items mentioned by Robert, it would "turn the tide" so to speak and I would include chocolates for the hembras especially. ;)  It is too bad our enlightened politicos do not take a lesson from history and try it. Imagine Trump 'tweeting' such a message similar to El Cid's. And then following through with it. But no!!!! There is no great profit margin in dropping 'bread' instead of bombs.

Yea, be nice to help and probably in doing so, placate the people with food and other non military aid, but the 'powers that be' in other nations, including the USA, sure would love to have some leverage and control over their vast petrol reserves, so guess that's not happening.

I hear the machinery in Venezuela, their means of production for bringing up, refining and exporting oil, is falling, rusting apart, but just how accurate the news is today is anybody's question.

I do know from guys who work in the oil business in the USA, especially just off shore, that when we hit oil, we usually cap it to save for later.

It's just a lot more practical to dance with other nation's leaders and get most of theirs--- the world's oil overseas, while they're still plentiful and it's cheaper for us than it is in most nations.

Guess we're waiting Maduro's tenure out, sort of smoking out a fox, albeit by squeezing the Venezuelan populace to make them apply exit pressure....

Then again, you don't see proportionate USA, or international in general aid--- humanitarian assistance for nations like Venezuela, although in the past, China and the Russians have done more. 

I can't see Cuba being of major help in Venezuela. I wonder what China's doing, because they've got their hands all over S. America, with major infrastructure projects. The moneys, if not majority ownership of such projects are tightly controlled by the Chinese and will remain so long after the projects are complete. I don't think S. American nations, or some Asian nations like the Philippines, know what they re doing dealing with, thinking  that by getting some aid 'gratis' from the Chinese, that there's not serious debt and long lasting control-- 'strings' attached. A deal with the devil, perhaps...

Meanwhile, we're saving our own oil for when it's really much more valuable. I bet it's cheaper, even with oil sands and fracking USA and Canadian oil, to import crude oil instead of bringing up, refining and storing our own domestically. Certainly cheaper and more advantageous long term.

Oddly, the news I hear is that Maduro has been rejecting humanitarian aid from the IMF, as he feels they're too close to the USA, but again, who the hell knows?

Hard to imagine, given description of hardships.

I am thinking whoever might succeed when Maduro is 'exited' may be about the same or worse. Although Venezuela is relatively sophisticated, they still, like S. America in general, tend to put 'strong man' dictator types in charge during such times. S. American mindset?

Hell, in the USA, we tend to elect politicians with the big hair, with capped, veneered teeth, guys who look like game show hosts and have millions in campaign donations (from donors they're later obligated to) to spend on  advertising. And almost always, the politician who spends, who advertises the most, wins. Sad. Are we any better than S. America in that regard?

Have you thought seriously of visiting there?

The below link on Venezuela and the IMF appears dated, as last time I heard, the inflation date was an astounding 40,000%+originally

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venezuela_and_the_International_Monetary_Fund

Reminds me almost of post WWI Germany. Inflation got so bad then that it actually became more economical to burn paper money to heat, to provide fire for stoves and cook, than it was to bundle up money into wheel barrows and use it to buy actual firewood or a loaf of bread.
 
I have some half billion mark paper money around the house somewhere. Be nice if they still honored that currency!I

I have an odd hobby. I collect money from nations that have experienced regime change and have discontinued a given currency.

I'm the 1970s, the Khemer Rouge, in what is now Cambodia, banned the production, the mere thought of 'money'-- but the communist Chinese briefly minted-- produced a Khmer Rouge paper currency for them anyway and I have some.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmer_Rouge

Small wonder that the desperate post WWI German population looked for a charismatic, messiah like appearing, nationalistic leader, who eventually led them into WWII.

So much has changed, yet history continues to repeat itself.
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robert angel wrote:
Quote
I wish we could carpet bomb their nation with pampers, OTC and needed pharm meds, candy bars, bread, potatoes, mac n cheese and spam......

Now this reminds me of a scene from the movie "El Cid" where  The Cid (not Sid Cherise) is laying siege to Valencia controlled by the Moors. In a key scene he yells out to the besieged within the walls: "I do not bring you fire and the sword. I bring you BREAD!!!!!". And the trebuchets are let loose filled with loaves of bread. After the bread lands withing the walls and the populace find the bread lying in the streets, the Moorish Caliph is overthrown by the mob. Great Scene.

All items mentioned by Robert, it would "turn the tide" so to speak and I would include chocolates for the hembras especially. ;)  It is too bad our enlightened politicos do not take a lesson from history and try it. Imagine Trump 'tweeting' such a message similar to El Cid's. And then following through with it. But no!!!! There is no great profit margin in dropping 'bread' instead of bombs.
5
My amiga's "Care" quarterly package finally passed customs at Puerto Cruz this morning. Food, OTC medicines, toiletries, diapers, clothes, and shoes, even school supplies were delivered. A family member who emigrated 6 years ago has been organizing this for a number of years now.


One will know when things get really bad there when, if in the future, Venezuelan customs finally stops all influx of items from Venezuelan emigrants that live in other countries. Or tariffs rise so high it becomes impossible to ship.   


What have you heard about (if even possible) sending USD$?


I hear because of all the (40,000%+) inflation and other related issues, that sending USD's isn't feasible--that as there's a shortage of their own money on hand there, the 'black market' to exchange USD's is better, but still extremely uneven, risky. Food, diapers, OTC medicines--I hear they really are hard to get.


My wife went home to the Philippines and she timed her 'care packages'--known as 'balikbayon boxes'--they must have weighed 250 pounds if they weighed an ounce--to arrive a week before she got there. That way, as 'returning princess' her luggage overage wasn't too bad.


But OTC meds like naproxen (Aleve) and things like Levis, Nikes, Adidas etc. are much, much cheaper in the USA. But that naproxen --they love it for aches and pains, so we sent a lot of that, along with a multitude of useful and some fun things "USA style"--clothes, electronic tablets, cell phones etc--a king's ransom in chocolate--they were very happy.


Besides--- their peso is weak, the USD is close to an all time high against it, so she was able to show them a 'good time on the town' while there. Still, for just about anything that's a USA brand, or any electronics, it was a lot cheaper to send it there than to exchange USDs to pesos and buy the same item there.


But Venezuela? Do you even get to--dare to visit her and her family yourself? I can't imagine the complications, the trying to visit, to try and get a fiancee or spousal visa--such a sad mess.


I wish we could carpet bomb their nation with pampers, OTC and needed pharm meds, candy bars, bread, potatoes, mac n cheese and spam......
6
My amiga's "Care" quarterly package finally passed customs at Puerto Cruz this morning. Food, OTC medicines, toiletries, diapers, clothes, and shoes, even school supplies were delivered. A family member who emigrated 6 years ago has been organizing this for a number of years now.


One will know when things get really bad there when, if in the future, Venezuelan customs finally stops all influx of items from Venezuelan emigrants that live in other countries. Or tariffs rise so high it becomes impossible to ship.   
7
Immigration and Visas / Re: form N-400
« Last post by robert angel on September 17, 2018, 10:03:32 AM »
Make sure the way you write her name matches correctly with the right documents. Initially, my wife included her Mom's name, as is traditional Filipino style, but that didn't match other USCIS documents and hung us up for a while.

My wife just got back from Philippines and she took her family from there to Hong Kong, to their smaller version of Disneyland and to Macau, China. Macau was really 'over the top', with each grand casino trying to outdo the next. One had a glass floor with solid gold Credit Suisse bars under foot

It rained and was super windy almost the whole time  and that was before the recent typhoons. People in HK were a lot less friendly than in Macau, which is only about an hour jet ferry ride away. Macau is far and away the largest by revenue gambling spot on earth and almost all places were open, even if you don't gamble.

My wife having a US passport got her through various lines a lot faster than the rest of the family did with their Phillipine's PP.
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Immigration and Visas / Re: form N-400
« Last post by thekfc on September 17, 2018, 09:08:47 AM »
Hey P.


My wife went thru that last year.


It was pretty standard.


We didn't do it online, we sent the forms in. At the time the online process was just starting & they still had some bugs so we didn't want to take the chance so we mail in the forms.


It didn't take that long as we had everything in order and sent in all supporting documents (even those we didn't had to).


Of the 100 study questions they will ask 10 - the wife answered first 6 right correctly so the interviewer stopped. Same questions that is on the list that is on the USCIS website.


She was then asked to read a sentence & then to write a sentence - they were very simple. I think the reading was "Who is the president President of the United States" & the writing was something similar.


She had to wait a little bit for the ceremony as she was getting a name change - that ceremony is done by a judge in a court house and they were backed up at the time as there was a huge amount of additional applicants.


When she did the ceremony the courtroom was packed with standing room only for some folks.


She could have applied for her US passport the same day but we waited a week before sending out for the US passport as we wanted to have copies of the certificate in case it get lost in transit.


So have she have already traveled to the PI with her US passport - that was this pass June & July. Both she and the kid did get the 1 year (visa) Balikbayan stamp, I didn't make the trip with them this time but if I did then I would have also gotten the 1 year visa stamp. They also stayed a little bit in Hong Kong as she also have family there.


On a side note, this time she didn't enjoy her stay as much as it rained just about every day she was in the PI (she was there for a month).
9
Immigration and Visas / Re: form N-400
« Last post by piglett on September 16, 2018, 04:08:43 PM »
They still have the 100-question list. Oral questions from the list are given at the interview and you need to get 6 out of 10 correct to pass.

The list of questions with answers is available on the USCIS.GOV Website, along with practice tests.

Ray
Thanks Ray,

I went on amazon & got my wife 2 books to study. the 1st one is the book the Gov. will send her at some point , the 2nd was on the "recommended list"
she goes to bio-metrics in a week




P
10
Latin -> General discussion / Re: Venezuela, what a mess, and spilling over at that....
« Last post by Calipro on September 14, 2018, 03:38:40 PM »

It doesn't surprise me in the least. Most men who marry foreign wives are not interested in expanding their cultural horizons. I am probably the only gringo married to a Spanish speaking wife who actually speaks Spanish. Whenever I am at the Spanish language Mass I have never seen another gringo there ever. It kind of amuses the Mexican-Americans to see me there actually but they are always very polite.


A gringo absolutely must learn Spanish to understand their Spanish speaking wife or girlfriend.
There are fundamental differences in the way we see the world because of the differences in our languages and religion if you aren't already catholic.


https://www.ted.com/talks/lera_boroditsky_how_language_shapes_the_way_we_think?language=en

The video touches on some of the differences of the Spanish language at about the 4:15 mark.
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