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Author Topic: Barranquilla more dangerous now?  (Read 435 times)

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Online mambocowboy

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Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« on: August 01, 2017, 11:00:46 PM »
My wife and 2 small kids plan to visit BAQ in December. I haven't visited since late 2011 and haven't had issues with crime there. My wife claims it's more dangerous now due to the Venezuelans coming over and raising the crime rate. Any truth to that?

Offline mudd

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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2017, 06:47:26 AM »
not from what my friend told me who lives there, he said its about the same. no different.

Online mambocowboy

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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2017, 08:47:07 AM »
not from what my friend told me who lives there, he said its about the same. no different.
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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2017, 08:47:07 AM »

Offline robert angel

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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2017, 10:25:55 AM »
We were vacationing 12 miles off the coast of Venezuela and  the people there were very concerned about the desparado nature of the Venezuelans coming ashore. No USDs in the ATMs, banks on alert, as the Venezuelan currency is a joke and they'd love to convert their inflation ridden currency to USD's. Or, I suppose,  'appropriate' such from US tourists.

Venezuelan's situation is just getting worse, with US sanctions announced yesterday after the rigged elections, really a 'non election'.

It's a failed socialist/communist state almost entirely based on oil revenues.

As the petroleum industry has more or less accepted that the drastic decrease in oil and gas prices is a correction and a long term situation, it's certainly not going to get any better soon. It's smart advice anywhere, but I'd watch my back on that situation.
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Online mambocowboy

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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2017, 12:22:43 PM »
We were vacationing 12 miles off the coast of Venezuela and  the people there were very concerned about the desparado nature of the Venezuelans coming ashore. No USDs in the ATMs, banks on alert, as the Venezuelan currency is a joke and they'd love to convert their inflation ridden currency to USD's. Or, I suppose,  'appropriate' such from US tourists.

Venezuelan's situation is just getting worse, with US sanctions announced yesterday after the rigged elections, really a 'non election'.

It's a failed socialist/communist state almost entirely based on oil revenues.

As the petroleum industry has more or less accepted that the drastic decrease in oil and gas prices is a correction and a long term situation, it's certainly not going to get any better soon. It's smart advice anywhere, but I'd watch my back on that situation.
Extreme poverty indeed...

Offline robert angel

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Re: Barranquilla more dangerous now?
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2017, 08:58:03 PM »
Speaking of Venezuela,  if you noticed yesterday or today that gasoline prices went up, here's why: Since the current President there, Maduro, set up the so called 'election' to create a dicatorship for his very own self while his people are increasingly hungry, the USA stopped importing about three quarter of a million barrels of oil from there. The new sanctions didn't take long to impact us, to the tune of a about a couple bucks a fill up for most people.

It's a small,world after all.... :o

http://www.fuelretailermagazine.com/august-1-2017-gasoline-diesel-prices-rise-countrywide/
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